The University of Minnesota Diversifies It’s Barley Program

St. Paul – November 17, 2015 – The University of Minnesota (UM) has played an integral part in the development of malting barley for over a century.  In the early part of the 20th century, this land grant institution cooperated with USDA Division of Cereal and Disease scientists located in St. Paul and participated in the evaluation of germplasm for its adaptation to upper Midwest growing conditions.  Much of this work was done by Dr. Harry Harlan who received his PhD from UM while working for the USDA.  The released varieties were mostly six-rows of the Manchurian type, that did well in Minnesota, but also included Trebi which became a dominant six-row malting barley in the western US and Alpha, a two-row variety that was popular in New York and New England.

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Interest in Winter Malting Barley is Growing

June 11, 2012 – Interest in winter malting barley varieties has grown over the last few years.  In many regions, winter cereals provide farmers with increased cropping options and management flexibility. A sufficiently winter hardy variety will begin growing vigorously in spring and enter the flowering and grain filling growth stages before the summer temperatures typically reach their peaks.  Plants are under less stress during these critical growing periods and winter barley yields can be twenty-five percent higher than spring grains grown in the same regions.  The early start means that the crop is ready to be harvested well in advance of spring sown cereals yielding several advantages to the producer.

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